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This one's for the ladies

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This one's for the ladies

Ladies,

What are you getting your spouse for the holidays this year? How about a gift that is beneficial for both you and the man in your life.

I hear so many wives complaining about their husband’s style and how they wish that they would dress better. Common gripes are that he’d stop wearing workout sneakers with jeans on the weekends, that he’d own more respectable casual clothes so that he looks handsomely dressed even when they are just going to brunch on a Sunday, or that he had more options to wear on date night.

We all know how looking good affects your mood and sensibility – it just does. If you dress like a slob you’re more likely to feel like a slob and sit on the couch and watch football all day. But if your man is feeling sharp in his weekend clothes, maybe he’ll be more inspired to take you shopping, to the museum, or the ballet!

What about those Saturday nights where you get a blow out, you wear the new dress and the heels that you know will pinch your toes but you do it anyway because it’s Saturday and you’ve got a babysitter. And then your darling husband throws on the jeans that were in a crumpled heap in the corner and the same “going out” shirt he wears every Saturday night. It’s disappointing, right? Most men are genetically wired to not like shopping the way most women do so their options are more limited. But how great would you both feel walking into the restaurant or party knowing that you might just be the best-dressed couple there?

What if you give your man an image upgrade for the holidays with Harrison Style? Here’s what it looks like:

We set up a time for me to edit his wardrobe for what works and what doesn’t. Those shirts that have been hanging in the closet since college because they were “expensive” or because his mom bought it for him ten years ago, will find a good home elsewhere (with his permission I’ll take his unwanted or unneeded clothes to a donation site or a consignment store so they’ll be out of your hair for good).

I’ll then come up with a game plan, a style strategy for what he needs in order to complete his wardrobe according to his lifestyle. I’ll shop for these pieces and pull looks together then we’ll select the pieces he wants/needs. Finally I’ll put the new outfits in a digital look book so he’ll never have to think twice about how to look sharp every single time no matter what the occasion.

A complete image make over as described above is $1295*. But from now until December 25th I’m offering $100 off. Send me an email and mention HOLIDAY STYLE and I’ll get a good-looking gift card in your hands for your soon-to-be-stylish husband in time for the holidays.

*cost of clothes is not included. 

Don't give your spouse more stuff he doesn't need this holiday season. Give the gift of style. 

Don't give your spouse more stuff he doesn't need this holiday season. Give the gift of style. 

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Give A Suit & Get Your Style On

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Give A Suit & Get Your Style On

Not sure what to give your loved one for the holidays this year? Sick of buying “stuff” just to have something to wrap up and put under the tree, which will ultimately take up space in your apartment?

 How about giving the gift of style?

 Now through December 31st, when you donate a gently used suit (or trousers and a sportcoat) to Career Gear, you’ll receive $100 off a wardrobe edit and personal styling and shopping package with Harrison Style * and 15% off a custom suit with Ian Rios, one of my favorite and most reasonably priced custom clothiers in the city (or a complimentary custom shirt with the purchase of a suit). Believe me, when we do a wardrobe edit there’ll be an old suit or two lurking in the back that no longer serve you.

So if you’re looking to do something good for others while looking sharp yourself (or help your spouse look sharp) then here is a perfect place to start.

Career Gear’s mission is to support the less fortunate in their successful transition to independent living, giving low-income men a chance at a fresh start. And we all know how dressing right for the interview, workplace or meeting can help you feel ready for the challenge ahead.

 So go ahead, do good, look good, feel good and let me help you get rid of those suits you no longer wear!

Million Dollar Listing's celeb/realtor Luis Ortiz is just one of Ian Rios' many high profile clients. 

Million Dollar Listing's celeb/realtor Luis Ortiz is just one of Ian Rios' many high profile clients. 

*Harrison Style packages are usually $1295 for a complete image (and dare I say “life”) upgrade, which includes a wardrobe edit, image consultation, personal shopping session & style session. Max of $100 off per package. **Cost of clothes not included – but keep in mind you don’t have to spend a fortune to look and feel amazing.

 

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How to wear a tie bar

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How to wear a tie bar

You’ve probably noticed that the tie bar has been making a comeback over the past few years. Some say it’s due to the influence of shows like “Mad Men” and “Boardwalk Empire,” others credit the reinvigorated men’s “dress-up” business, or the general feeling that men want to make more effort in their appearance. Either way it’s a sharp new tool that guys should have in their accessories box. It’s masculine, clean, modern and takes you up a notch in the style department without looking flamboyant or like you’re trying too hard.

So if you’ve been thinking about delving into the world of tie bars, or buying one as a gift this holiday, then you should read this because not all tie bars are created equal.

What’s the proper width?

A tie bar should never extend beyond the width of your tie. For a modern look it should be three-quarters of the width of your tie.

What color and style?

To be safe, opt for a silver or brushed silver bar. You’ll find a wide variety from plain, to mixed metals, to patterned to novelty. Start simple and work your way up. A novelty bar, such as a skull or anchor, can add a pop of personality to an otherwise ordinary outfit, but you don’t want to look gimmicky.

Where to clip?

This is the part that guys often get wrong. Don’t wear it too high or too low -- this separates the amateurs from the style savvy pros. The rule is this: It goes between the third and fourth button of your dress shirt.

How to clip?

Though it may just look like a decorative accessory, the tie bar actually was invented to keep your tie out of your lunch. And it doesn’t just fasten the front part of your tie to the back part; it should also fasten to the placket of your dress shirt. Just think, you’ll never get whipped in the face by your tie in a wind tunnel. Because I knew you were concerned about that.

That’s it. Easy as pie.

Now here are some tie bars I love. 

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     Jan Leslie Cobra Laser-Print Tie Bar, $125 www.bergdorfgoodman.com

Jan Leslie Cobra Laser-Print Tie Bar, $125 www.bergdorfgoodman.com

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     Alexander McQueen, Skull Sword Tie Bar, Dark Silver, $235 www.bergdorfgoodman.com

Alexander McQueen, Skull Sword Tie Bar, Dark Silver, $235 www.bergdorfgoodman.com

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     Arrow Tie Clip, J. Crew, $49.50 www.jcrew.com

Arrow Tie Clip, J. Crew, $49.50 www.jcrew.com

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     BottegaVeneta Intrecciato-Engraved Silver Tie-Clip, $220   www.mrporter.com

BottegaVeneta Intrecciato-Engraved Silver Tie-Clip, $220 www.mrporter.com


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     Barneys New York, $85 www.barneys.com

Barneys New York, $85 www.barneys.com

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A Signature Look....        Smart or Boring?

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A Signature Look.... Smart or Boring?

What do Apple’s Steve Jobs, Twitter’s Jack Dorsey and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg all have in common? Aside from the obvious? They're all known for a signature look. For Jobs it was his signature black turtleneck, Dorsey it’s his sharp Prada suit and Zuckerberg it’s his plain old gray t-shirt. This week, following Zuckerman’s first ever Q&A at the Facebook headquarters in Silicon Valley, he commented on his “look”.

According to the CEO and billionaire, he wears the same type of t-shirt day in and day out not because he’s trying to start a gray t-shirt movement, it’s because he doesn’t want to waste any time or energy on “silly” or “frivolous” things such as choosing what to wear in the morning or deciding what to eat for breakfast.

"I really want to clear my life so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community,” he said.

Admirable, maybe. Boring, absolutely. I don’t think you have to be a fashion hound to acknowledge that how you dress can often affect your mood and attitude. For example putting on a sharp suit, shirt and tie combo and knowing it fits well can make you feel prepared and confident about heading into an important meeting or interview in the same way that pulling on jeans and a football jersey can get you in the spirit to meet your buddies for Monday night football.

What I do understand is that getting those details right (making sure you have two or three perfect suits that you know you look good in and knowing exactly what to wear with them, or finding the best fitting jeans, or figuring out how to look casual but not sloppy) can be time consuming and require a lot of thought, trying on, uncertainty and shopping.

That’s where I come in. Most of my clients don’t have the time or the desire to shop. I meet my clients, do a quick evaluation of what they already have in their closet then I come up with a strategy of what they need, and I shop for those key pieces. I photograph the looks (whether it’s tailored clothing for work or a special event, more casual looks for dates, or even relaxed but put-together weekend outfits) and my guys can refer to those pictures in a second, be dressed and out the door without ever even having to think about what they should wear.

So while Zuckerberg may think looking good is “silly”, I have to wholeheartedly disagree. In fact, I’m going to reach out to him and offer to style him myself, and I guarantee he wouldn’t need to use a single synapse of his nerdy brain-power on his clothing choices.

And I bet his wife would be happy. Is she really going to stare at his gray t-shirt for the rest of her life?

If you are looking to create a signature (yet sharp) look or you want me to help you streamline your clothing choices while saving you time and money, just shoot me an email. I’m offering a 10% discount to the first twenty people to respond with the subject line “Zuckerberg Challenge.”

Go!

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     Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Rain is no excuse for bad style!

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Rain is no excuse for bad style!

I recently write a column for DOWNTOWN Magazine answering style queries from guys on everything from how to step up their game in the shoe department to how to achieve that cool layered look. This week I wrote about how to stay dry and look good in the rain, and, given the dreary drizzle in NYC today, my timing was pretty good so I’m reposting it here….

Q: It’s raining out. I’ve been trying to get by with an umbrella so I don’t have to buy yet another jacket but I’m getting drenched. Do I really need to go out and buy a raincoat?

Well, let me start by telling you what doesn’t look good: that windbreaker with your company’s logo on it from six years and two jobs ago. Ditch that immediately.

There is nothing worse than sitting in the office in wet clothes all day so, yes, you do need a wet weather solution. It can, however, be more functional than a basic raincoat.

For a woman, the decision on what to wear in a downpour is easy. Most of us have some sort of trench that we bought especially for rainy days and, in fact, we are quite excited to have the opportunity to wear it. But guys may not feel the same way. You don’t need ten coats, one for snow, one for rain, one for warm weather etc. You need a few that are versatile, that you can layer, and will get you through more than just a few rainy days.

That’s why I love coated or waxed lightweight jackets that can double as a sportcoat. If it’s too lightweight for fall, pair it with a vest, like the zip-in waistcoats from Barbour. Then in the spring, when the days get warmer again, you can wear it alone without the extra layer.

If you wear a suit to work every day, you’ll need something longer so opt for a trench that fits over your suit or sportcoat. I love a nice navy trench on a man, especially with a gray suit underneath. It looks slightly more modern than the classic khaki trenches, but that all depends on your coloring. Here are a few trenches that work great with workwear.

Also, please invest in a quality umbrella and not one of those five dollar pieces of junk you get on the street corner. Though rain can be a pain, it can also be an opportunity to show off some style. And nothing says you’re a gentleman like a handsome umbrella.

Burberry

Burberry

Hokkaido Waterproof Blazer, $475

Hokkaido Waterproof Blazer, $475

Stutterheim Stockholm Raincoat, $445

Stutterheim Stockholm Raincoat, $445

Brunello Cucinelli Waterproof Jacket, $2,880

Brunello Cucinelli Waterproof Jacket, $2,880

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How to dress when the rules are changing

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How to dress when the rules are changing

This week I attended the Autism Speaks to Wall Street Celebrity Chef Gala. It was an amazing event, raising awareness and funds for an incredibly important cause. (Did you know that autism affects 70 million people worldwide? Did you know that one in 68 children and one in 42 boys lives with autism?) That evening raised $1.3 million. It was very powerful and touching and I wrote about it for DOWNTOWN Magazine here.

But, as a men’s style consultant, I can’t go to an event like that, when everyone is all dressed up, and not think about menswear and how this applies to my clients. The event was called a “Gala” but these days what does that even mean when it comes to dressing?

The consensus, according to a quick Google search, is that you should go all out and wear your absolute best attire, but that wasn’t necessarily the case last night. Men wore all varieties of "gala" attire from suits with ties and pocket squares to no ties at all to a few slim-fitting sweaters. There were not many tuxedos, and Robert De Niro wore a black polo shirt, navy blazer and grey pants. Women wore everything from business suits to ball gowns. Which all goes to show that the rules for dressing are changing constantly.

The safest bet for women attending a gala or charity event (unless otherwise specified) is a cocktail dress. For men, a good-fitting suit (more on that here), but with a touch more effort than what you’d wear for the office – a sharp shirt and tie combo with a tie bar or an open collar with a pocket square. An invite to a gala ten years ago would have been significantly more dressed up affair, but these days it’s more about looking sharp and making an effort than it is about busting out your best formal wear.

 So next time you have an event to go to and you’re not sure what to wear, feel free to shoot me an email. In case you couldn’t tell I love talking about all this. 

Me and Ted Allen

Me and Ted Allen

Above is me and the host of the evening, Ted Allen from Chopped, sporting a perfectly put together suit, slim tie, tie bar and just a peek of a pocket square. 

Autism Speaks Co-Founders Suzanne and Bob Wright with Robert De Niro.

Autism Speaks Co-Founders Suzanne and Bob Wright with Robert De Niro.

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10 ways your suit is letting you down

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10 ways your suit is letting you down

I must admit, I’m a bit of a silent critic when it comes to men and their suits. I walk down the street and see terrible offenders -- pants that are way too long, jackets that swallow the man like a cape, pleats that look like balloons. I want to stop the guy on the street, take him to the nearest tailor and impress upon him just how much better/younger/slimmer he would look if we trimmed this, hemmed those and adjusted that. But I try not to offer unsolicited advice. Well not to strangers anyway.

I do, however, understand why it can be so confusing. Just flicking through the pages of GQ, Esquire or the Barneys catalogue is likely to leave you even more perplexed. You’ll see wide, dramatic jacket lapels on a Tom Ford suit, next to Yves Saint Laurent’s skinny pencil thin lapels. And then there are the Thom Browne skin-tight pants hemmed above the ankle.  All well-respected fashion houses with talented designers but who’s to say which one is right?

The answer?  What’s right is what looks good on you, your body type and what’s appropriate for your career and lifestyle. And yet there are certain subtle styling and fit details that distinguish the modern man from the guy who’s been wearing the same five suits for the last ten years.

Read on for 10 tips that will ensure that your suits are not letting you down.   

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    From left clockwise: Ian Rios, Canali,   Hickey Freeman, Samuelsohn.

From left clockwise: Ian Rios, Canali, Hickey Freeman, Samuelsohn.

Keep it simple

The contemporary suit should be slim, streamlined and simple. And that doesn’t mean you have to be stick-thin to wear it. Even if you’re a taller or more muscular guy, extra fabric, long jackets and baggy trousers don’t hide anything, in fact they make you look bigger and sloppier than you should.

You don’t have to be aggressive and “in your face” with bold patterns or pin stripes to make a statement. A simple, two-button navy or charcoal suit that fits is an excellent starting point.

Check the shoulders

Make sure the jacket fits the shoulders well. If it fits in the shoulders you can easily take it to the tailor to make other adjustments to upgrade your style. If it doesn’t fit in the shoulders don’t buy it.

“The seam on your suit shoulder should lie directly above where your arm and shoulder meet,” says Arnold Brant Silverstone, President and Chief Design Director for Hickey Freeman and Samuelsohn. “Make sure the front of your suit closes comfortably -- always fasten at least one button to confirm the fit. The last thing you want are buttons that are being pulled too tight or the bottom of your jacket curling upward.”

Don’t get too comfortable

So how should your jacket feel when it’s on? According to bespoke tailor to the stars Ian Rios, a suit jacket should feel like a hug.

“It shouldn’t be loose, it shouldn’t be tight. You should be able to move comfortably but you shouldn’t feel so comfortable that you can play tennis. Suits are not built for that. If it’s too comfortable, it’s too big!”

Go shorty

A shorter jacket separates the modern suit from the ones that have been hanging in your closet for ten years. If you can easily cup the bottom of your jacket with your hands you are in good shape. Any longer and you’re basically wearing an overcoat.

Trim your sleeves

Your jacket sleeve should hit right at the wrist and should show about half an inch of your shirt cuff. And don’t be afraid to get those jacket sleeves taken in if they are too baggy. It will cost about $40 at the tailor but could give an older suit a total refresh, eliminate balloon arms and sharpen up your whole look.

Hem your trousers and check out your rear…

The most common mistake I see is pant length. A shorter break (the small crease caused when the top of your shoe meets the bottom of your trouser leg) is a more contemporary look. Let your pants just touch the top of your shoes for no break, or if you’re a taller, more muscular guy, a slight crease at the front is ok, but never let the hem go beyond the heel of your shoe and bunch up.

As for fit, Silverstone of Hickey Freeman says the seat of the pants is equally important. “When it comes to trousers a clean fit across the back always shows that the fit is right,” he says, “Otherwise the pants can hang in a sloppy drape that doesn’t flatter anyone’s body.”

A good tailor can usually take in the seat of the trousers if they are too loose, but too much tinkering will start to pull on the pockets and change the way the trousers fit in the wrong places. And it’s more difficult to let the seat out than take it in, so don’t buy if they are too tight in the rear. 

Lose the pleats and cuffs

While you can still find pleats and cuffs out there on the racks, your best bet is to avoid them. Opt instead for flat front pants and no cuffs for a cleaner, streamlined, more modern look. Cuffs are occasionally suitable for trousers in a heavier fabric, such as corduroy, but if in doubt go without. 

Wear lapels accordingly

When bespoke tailor Ian Rios helps his clients select the best lapel width for the man, he considers three things: his occupation, his body type and the width of the tie he wears. Obviously a very skinny lapel is going to look a lot more fashion forward and probably not be suitable for a lawyer, but perfect for an edgy advertising exec. If you want to be up-to-date but not too trendy, you can’t go wrong with a three inch lapel.

Pocket it

If you’ve got a few pounds to lose, the simple addition of a pocket square will draw the eyes away from the gut to the chest. A white linen pocket square will add a fresh, crisp, confidence-boosting element to your overall appearance.

Get yourself a good tailor

If you want a suit that is made to fit your body like a glove, no matter how short, tall, large or skinny you are, then pay up and get a custom suit (the only downside is that you may never return to off-the rack suits). But a really good tailor can work wonders, breathing new life into your existing suits. A nip at the waist, narrowing the sleeves, hemming the pants and maybe even slimming the pant leg will revamp and modernize your existing trousers and jackets.

So go home and take a look through your suits tonight. Try them on. Do you feel sharp and confident, or do you feel sloppy and out of date? Your suit should be working for you to emphasize your best attributes, if it doesn’t do that it’s time to part ways and go with a younger model.

Feel free to reach out with any questions and if you need someone to guide you through the process give me a shout!

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    From left:   Samuelsohn  , Isaia, Zegna  .

From left: Samuelsohn, Isaia, Zegna.

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How to look (razor) sharp in a tuxedo

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How to look (razor) sharp in a tuxedo

Two guys were chatting at a bar. One told the other that he needed to order a bespoke tuxedo in time for his upcoming 30th birthday. His friend asked him if he had a big event or party he was planning. He didn’t. And this was his response: “My Dad always told me, you should have a custom tuxedo made for your 30th.  And you should make sure you can fit into it for the rest of your life. It’s an investment, it’s classic, and it proves that you’re doing well in life to be able to invest in custom. Not only that, it will always remind you what kind of shape you were in when you were in your prime.”

I love this sentiment. There is something about going for the plunge and getting a custom tuxedo that says you’ve made it. And if you’re going to get one (and you really only need one tuxedo) then you’d better get it right. While there are many excellent custom tailored clothing studios in Manhattan and beyond, this week I’m zooming in on the classic yet modern aesthetic at Michael Andrews Bespoke. I sat down with VP of Operations Cory Sylvester to get his take on what makes for a classic bespoke tuxedo that will ensure you’re the sharpest looking man at the party.

Black, blue or white?

“When guys come in looking for a tuxedo they want to go traditional as they know this will be the only tuxedo they will need and they want it to last,” says Cory. “They generally think they want black, which always looks good, but I like to remind them that midnight blue is also a very classy option.”

Actually the first tuxedo ever made was midnight blue, not black, when it was first commissioned by Edward VII way back in 1861. The reason it looks sharp is the subtle contrast of the black satin lapel against the very dark blue, which gives an incredible depth of contrast that photographs well.

And then there’s always the option of a white dinner jacket, for a very Sean Connery James Bond look.

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    From left clockwise: Classic black tuxedo with velvet lapel by Michael Andrews; white dinner jacket with covered placket shirt both by Michael Andrews; midnight blue tuxedo jacket with shawl collar by Brioni, worn by Daniel Craig at the 2012 Skyfall Premier; Sean Connery in peek lapel white dinner jacket in Diamonds are Forever, 1971. 

From left clockwise: Classic black tuxedo with velvet lapel by Michael Andrews; white dinner jacket with covered placket shirt both by Michael Andrews; midnight blue tuxedo jacket with shawl collar by Brioni, worn by Daniel Craig at the 2012 Skyfall Premier; Sean Connery in peek lapel white dinner jacket in Diamonds are Forever, 1971. 

Fabric

How your tux feels and drapes is also of utmost importance. Though fabrics and styles differ at various custom shops, Michael Andrews offers a barathea weave (which has a very slight knit-like feel as opposed to being completely flat and looks good against the satin lapel and the stripe of satin on down the trouser leg). They had the mill Dormeil make this fabric available in the deepest darkest midnight blue for customers who want to go that route.

A second option is a mohair blend – 90 percent mohair and ten percent worsted wool. You can get this in a ten ounce fabric or for guys who seem to heat up at formal events, a lighter weight eight ounce “super brio” will help you keep your cool. Might be a good choice for grooms when they are waiting at the altar!

The details

A peak lapel or a shawl collar – take your pick – but never, ever, do a notch lapel on a tuxedo. It’s just not a classic look, Cory warns.

“Even though you might see Prada doing a notch lapel on tuxedos to be different or edgy, it’s just wrong,” he says, “It makes me cringe!”

The majority of Cory’s clients opt for a peak lapel and he suggests they go for a slightly fuller, wider lapel than they might wear with a regular suit. The lapel itself can be a smooth duchess satin or a slightly textured grosgrain, depending on what suit fabric you choose. And while velvet can be a very distinct, fashion-forward, look on a lapel it’s generally too seasonal and wouldn’t look right for a summer wedding or event so stick to satin for versatility.

The jacket should always be single button (never two unless you go for double breasted but that’s a whole look, and blog post, of its own). Jetted (aka straight) pockets, no flaps – which are too casual for formalwear.

As for vents at the back of the jacket, while the most classic look is ventless for a tuxedo, Cory believes that two side vents is actually a more flattering look. It creates a higher leg line and is more functional and comfortable for a slim fit.

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    The details, from left clockwise: Black on black Michael Andrews peek satin lapel; shawl collar on white dinner jacket; Ferragamo formal shoe, midnight blue Michael Andrews single button and jetted pockets. 

The details, from left clockwise: Black on black Michael Andrews peek satin lapel; shawl collar on white dinner jacket; Ferragamo formal shoe, midnight blue Michael Andrews single button and jetted pockets. 

Below the belt

No belt, no belt loops on a tux. Michael Andrews offer a signature waistband with a slim strip of satin, which means you don’t have to deal with a cummerbund. And the half-inch braid of satin that runs down the leg would match the satin on your lapel.

As for the length of your tuxedo trousers, Cory suggests a light break when it comes to formal wear (meaning the trouser leg just hits the top of your shoe). If you’re wearing a tux there’s a good chance you’ll be getting your picture taken standing up, especially at a wedding, most definitely if you are the groom, so you never want to see the trouser leg bunched up at the shoe.

The Extras: Shirts and shoes and bowties

The most modern but still classic look for a tuxedo shirt is a white textured fabric, classic semi-spread collar and always French cuffs – no bibs or pleats necessary. You can opt for four stud holes or, for a more minimal look, a covered placket where a smooth strip of fabric covers the buttons completely.

Ferragamo makes an excellent formal shoe in black velvet or patent leather – patent leather is a more year-round and versatile look.

And for bowties, hand tied, please, but you knew that already, right?

Feel free to reach out with any questions, and if you need someone to guide you through the process further, give me a shout.  

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Sidewalks as runways

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Sidewalks as runways

I often stop well-dressed men on the street and take their picture for my blog but the person who does this best, capturing not only the person’s look but their story, is undoubtedly Humans of New York photographer Brandon Stanton

He’s not a fashion photographer and he doesn’t necessarily stop people for their fashion choices, but I am obsessed with the images he captures. And, of course, I can’t help but admire the street style. He reminds me to keep my eyes open always. To look up and make eye contact instead of staring at my phone as I walk up Broadway, through the East Village or along Fifth Ave. He reminds me that inspiration is everywhere.

I have a feeling I’m going to be referring back to Brandon’s photography and street style often in this space, but here are a few of my recent favorites. 

photo 2-1.JPG

I think what I love most about the style Brandon captures is the authenticity and personality in each shot. Look at the guy on the left above in blue reading the paper, the way he rolls the sleeves on his sweater over his shirt, or the guy on the right with his bright yellow jacket and his polka dot socks - he pulls it off. 

And below, see how the guy with the red pants pulled his look together with a red pocket square, and the way the man on the left wears his hat slightly tipped to one side and the briefcase he choses to carry. It’s those small details that give a glimpse of personality through what we wear and how we chose to wear it. 

photo 3.JPG
I love how these duos compliment each other's style.

I love how these duos compliment each other's style.

Brandon doesn’t always look for the impeccably styled, but rather the individuals who are revealing a little bit of them themselves to the world, who are offering up a glimpse of their personality to strangers. 

It makes me wonder, does your outward appearance reflect your personality? If Brandon Stanton passed you on the street, camera in hand, would he stop you and ask to take your picture?

Love the two couples on the left here, matching furs, matching frames. The attitude from the middle two guys is outstanding and the poor guy on the right still manages to look handsomely disheveled  in a brace and crutches. 

Love the two couples on the left here, matching furs, matching frames. The attitude from the middle two guys is outstanding and the poor guy on the right still manages to look handsomely disheveled  in a brace and crutches. 

Feel free to reach out with your style questions, and if you'd like to add your significant other or friend to this list to receive free weekly style tips, just send me their email address. 

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Have you checked in on your shoes lately?

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Have you checked in on your shoes lately?

It may still feel like summer, and if you're like most men I know, I'm sure that shopping and looking sharp for the change of season is probably not high on your list, yet. But just wait for that crispness in the air, those leaves falling and you’ll notice everyone starts taking their style up a notch or two.

So I’ll start small, I’ll head into my thoughts on Fall dressing slowly – with shoes.

When you’re looking at your shoes (flip flops and loafers moved aside) do you see nothing but a collective blob of black, brown or tan? If so you might be missing the boat when it comes to footwear.

Right now the trend toward blue shoes is still going strong. In fact, during Market Week in NY (a time when retailers from all over the country come to NYC trade shows and show rooms to view the latest designs and place orders for their stores for the following season) all variety of blue shoes were part of almost every collection, from loafers to wingtips, to sneakers. (Think jeans and smart blue brogues with a shirt or t-shirt and casual sport coat.)

But if blue is not for you there are other options that can take your style up a notch without going crazy – cognac, muted green suede, or even just a different color shoe lace.  The trick is to find that balance between adding subtle color without going overboard and looking cheesy.

If you need a hand in picking out the right shoes for your personal style feel free to reach out or shoot me an email at  Nicola@harrison-style.com.

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    Pictured from top clockwise: Austen Heller, Boga, Just A Men Shoe, Walk-Over, Trask.  Top of page: Hadleighs

Pictured from top clockwise: Austen Heller, Boga, Just A Men Shoe, Walk-Over, Trask.

Top of page: Hadleighs

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Sign up for style

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Sign up for style

Friends!

Launching Harrison Style this year has been a very exciting time and I've been keeping a track of all the cool menswear finds, looks and people I meet along the way on my blog, The Hunt. 

If you'd like to stay in the loop and receive weekly style tips and updates simply sign up below with your email address. 

Thanks for your support! 

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A Transformation Story

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A Transformation Story

I met Michael earlier this year. He’s a life coach and he’s one of those people who is full of positive, friendly energy. From the minute I met him I thought, ok, I can see why people want coaching from this guy. You feel good when you’re around him. He wants to connect you to people he knows with similar interests. He has positive affirmations on his walls, he does yoga, he meditates, and he motivates people to turn their lives and careers around. All around good guy.

But his clothes didn’t reflect that. While his personality was big and friendly and outgoing, the outward perception was a bit ho-hum and didn’t make a statement so my goal was to bring his style up a notch or two to match his fast growing ambitions.

After the initial wardrobe consultation, I left his apartment with three, full, trash bags of clothes to donate to the Bowery Mission. The homeless scored but Michael was left with slim pickings in his closet so I knew I had to get to work fast.  We had a clean slate to work with so I scheduled a shopping session ASAP.

I quickly discovered that Michael likes color. He’s not afraid of bold statements. He goes to lots of networking events, he does podcasts and video segments on YouTube, he has speaking engagements, and he doesn’t mind at all (in fact LOVES) being the guy who stands out. This is a stylists dream. He wanted to be fashionable but he also needed a look that meant business.

We shopped for casual summer clothes that will keep him cool but also look cool enough for meetings. We looked for slim fitting suits that would give him an edge and show off his physique, and for pieces he could dress up or down. 

I could go on and on about styling Michael. We had a blast (in case you can’t tell from the following pictures). And then he went on to refer me to his friend (future blog) and then another, and then another. I’ll take that to mean his friends approve of the new look. But for now I will let you see the transformation yourself. And you can always click here to see what he thought of the process.

Here are some before and after pictures. Let me know what you think. And if you or someone you know is looking for a transformation or just a wardrobe refresher, give me a shout

BEFORE...

These are the before pics. 

These are the before pics. 

 

AND AFTER.....

Summer style

Summer style

Love the blue shoes. Oh wait do I see mankles?!

Love the blue shoes. Oh wait do I see mankles?!

My philosophy: look and feel as good when you walk the dog as you do when you attend a meeting or go on a date. Look good = feel good. 

My philosophy: look and feel as good when you walk the dog as you do when you attend a meeting or go on a date. Look good = feel good. 

Oh yeah, did I mention we had fun on this photo shoot. The boy can dance! 

Oh yeah, did I mention we had fun on this photo shoot. The boy can dance! 




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